Australia’s Agricultural Supply Chain Platform Adopts Hedera Hashgraph

Entrust, an Australian agricultural supply chain platform has adopted Hedera Hashgraph for agricultural products supply chain traceability, according to a blog post on September 21, 2020.

Entrust Taps Hedera Hashgraph

In a bid to further enhance transparency and scale its platform, Entrust, a South Australian full-service agricultural supply chain platform has chosen Hedera Hashgraph as its distributed ledger technology (DLT) network of choice.

Launched this September by Steven Marshall, South Australia’s 46th and current Premier, the platform is designed to promote trust and secure the growth of the region’s high-value wine and dairy manufacturing industries.

Specifically, Entrust claims to enable producers of agric products to easily monitor the movement of their raw materials from the farm down to when they’re used to manufacture secondary products, thereby preventing counterfeiting.

Entrust says it combines geolocation, time-stamping and the storage of vital information on an immutable ledger to achieve total supply chain transparency. The Entrust platform, which is currently in its beta phase, is reportedly being trialled by some companies in the Clare Valley wine region of Australia.

Global Expansion

Commenting on the initiative, Rob Allen, Entrust’s technical director made it clear that the partnership with Hedera Hashgraph will make it possible for the project too scale its beta platform and expand its operations to other agricultural commodities and wine-producing nations.

In his words:

“Owned and governed by supply chain heavyweights including IBM, LGE and Boeing, Hedera provides us with immediate recognition across the globe and boosts our customers’ confidence by making them know that they’re working with established distributed ledger players. The platform will also scale with us as we expand into other agricultural verticals.”

Officially launched in September 2019, Hedera Hashraph claims to be a highly scalable distributed ledger technology network that uses a Directed Acyclic Graph to succeed where blockchains fail.

Australia remains one of the jurisdictions actively exploring distributed ledger technology and the nation also has a liberal stance towards digital currencies.

Earlier in August 2020, IP Australia, the country’s major intellectual property rights agency joined forces with the National Rugby League (NRL) to test the usefulness of blockchain technology in tackling merchandise counterfeiting.

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